#5 No Man's Land - Conflicts of Space

"There was a big high wall there that tried to stop me. The sign was painted, said 'Private Property.' But on the backside, it didn't say nothing. This land was made for you and me." This verse belongs to one of the most famous American folk songs, "This Land Is Your Land", written by Woody Guthrie as a protest song. Ironically, this verse was never released. In several ways, the verse captures a tension between the occupation and liberation of land. Land that belongs to... Yes, to whom exactly?

Geographer David Harvey writes in The Condition of Postmodernity that "the organization of space has become the primary aesthetic problem of the mid-twentieth century culture”. Historically, anthropologically, socially and culturally speaking there are many different ways of dealing with space. Looking at the recent war in Syria, the Israel-Palestine conflict, the numerous ongoing wars in Africa, the millions of refugees around the globe, the organization of space is a fundamental problem. A problem that needs to be challenged by alternative ways of thinking about space in conflict areas. What is the role of politics when it comes to the division of land? Can we say that the justification of organizing and claiming space is a result of imperialism? How can we reinscribe meaning to borders, checkpoints, settlements and walls that can be productive for the space and/or conflict?  And can we think of non-space as a form of resistance, a room to challenge the different ways of how conflict is being dealt with?

#5 No Man's Land - Conflicts of Space

Visual artist: Thomas Montulet

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